The Other Inconvenient Truth: The Crisis in Global Land Use

As the international community focuses on climate change as the great challenge of our era, it is ignoring another looming problem — the global crisis in land use. With agricultural practices already causing massive ecological impact, the world must now find new ways to feed its burgeoning population and launch a “Greener” Revolution.

Jonathan Foley, Yale Environment 360, October, 5, 2009

It’s taken a long time, but the issue of global climate change is finally getting the attention it deserves. While enormous technical, policy, and economic issues remain to be solved, there is now widespread acceptance of the need to confront the twin challenges of energy security and climate change. Collectively, we are beginning to acknowledge that our long addiction to fossil fuels — which has been harming our national security, our economy and our environment for decades — must end. The question today is no longer why, but how. The die is cast, and our relationship to energy will never be the same.

Unfortunately, this positive shift in the national zeitgeist has had an unintended downside. In the rush to portray the perils of climate change, many other serious issues have been largely ignored. Climate change has become the poster child of environmental crises, complete with its own celebrities and campaigners. But is it so serious that we can afford to overlook the rise of infectious disease, the collapse of fisheries, the ongoing loss of forests and biodiversity, and the depletion of global water supplies?

Although I’m a climate scientist by training, I worry about this collective fixation on global warming as the mother of all environmental problems. Learning from the research my colleagues and I have done over the past decade, I fear we are neglecting another, equally inconvenient truth: that we now face a global crisis in land use and agriculture that could undermine the health, security, and sustainability of our civilization. Continue lendo

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Europa se ahoga en nitrógeno

Público, 17 de abril de 2011

No se trata de una vía de contaminación demasiado conocida, pero la polución por nitrógeno reactivo es un auténtico problema de salud pública que, además, cuesta a cada europeo entre 150 y 750 euros anuales. La primera Evaluación Europea del Nitrógeno (ENA, de sus siglas en inglés), presentada ayer en una reunión científica que se celebra en Edimburgo (Reino Unido), pone cifras a algo que lleva años preocupando a la comunidad científica y que no presenta una solución fácil. Continue lendo